Books & Brews Review: Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

I have to be honest….Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children took me a little longer to read then usual for me. It wasn’t because I didn’t enjoy it. It was because the novel was different from anything I’ve read in a long time. I wanted to enjoy every minute.  It has the elements of horror and fantasy all rolled into one throughly entertaining read, and it brought me back to my childhood. I’m well past my young adult days of Fear Street and Christopher Pike, but I found Ransom Riggs’ novel a fun read no matter what your age.

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When I first discovered the novel on Goodreads, I thought the photos throughout the book might come across as juvenile. I enjoy imagining the people and places within a story myself, which is why I always try to read the book before seeing the movie.  I thought the photos might take away from that a little. However, the integration of the photos are a great addition to the book as the plot stems from those very photographs. The photographs also add a certain creepiness to the story that I don’t think would be present without them.

The story begins with the typical awkward teenage boy, with no friends, save for the one that he essentially hires to be his friend through tutoring. Jacob, has a very close relationship with his Grandpa Portman, who had a panache for telling tall tales. The stories Grandpa Portman told of his escape from Poland during the war to an orphanage intrigued Jacob. The orphanage was home to children that were quite different. An invisible boy. A girl that floats. A boy with bees in his stomach. A girl with a second mouth in the back of her head. And Grandpa Portman had pictures of them all and more. But as Jacob grew older, he began to doubt the truth behind the tales and the photographs.

Without spoiling too much, Jacob winds up on an adventure on a remote island off the coast of Wales to trying to track down the orphanage and its occupants. The story that follows is fantastical and entertaining, and much better than the movie. If you’ve seen the movie, you know most of the story. The movie does follow the book quite closely as the story goes, but the certain characters are switched around and the ending, well, not the same at all. It is a fun read for both adults and kids.

Short’s Brewing Company is based out of Bellaire, Michigan. I tried on of their seasonal brews, Double Magician, a double London-style Red Ale. It is a medium bodied brew, but I found it a bit on the heavier side and a little bitter. The description of the brew mentions flavors of toffee and raisins. Maybe my palette is as refined as it once was, but I didn’t get any of those flavors. It’s also on the higher APV at 8.1%, so a sipping brew for sure. If you enjoy ales and a hoppier beer, I would recommend. Myself, I wouldn’t get this one again, but I will definitely try out their “regular” Magician.

For the Love of Books

I’ve been an avid reader my entire life. My earliest memories of childhood reading hundreds upon hundreds of BabySitters Club, Nancy Drew & Fear Street books. At 10 or 11, I began sneaking my mom’s Stephen King books. IT & Skeleton Crew among my first. I became a life long King fan from that moment on.

Over the years, however, my love for books and reading has occasionally been pushed to the back burner. There were years I maybe read only one or two books throughout the year. But it is the one hobby I never gave up on. And it’s because I found ways to challenge myself and make reading a little more interesting. For me, my passion for reading was reignited because of a Goodreads account.

If you don’t have a Goodreads account, make one. Every year they have an annual reading challenge where you can set the amount of books you want to read in a year. I found that setting a goal helped push me on those days I really didn’t want to read. I also joined reading challenge groups on the site that had silly “challenges,” like the “Alphabet Challenge,” where you read a book that starts with each letter of the alphabet. I also find lists from Goodreads or BookBub Blog helpful. My next reading challenge will to be to work through some of my saved lists on Pinterest.

My current reading challenge is to read through Stephen King’s entire bibliography in order of publication. I’m about 11 novels down and around 50ish to go. It’s been an interesting journey seeing King’s writing style develop over the course of time. It’s something I probably would have never noticed had I not gone back and started from the beginning. Several of his earlier books I had not read, and I’m beginning to see his characters & worlds intertwining. Reading through your favorite author’s bibliography is something I highly recommend.  I do break it up every few novels by reading something else, so I’m not entirely overwhelmed.

Another fun way to kind get back into the reading habit is book hoarding, hunting, at used book sales at local libraries. I discovered this obsession hobby of mine as we decided to begin collecting all of Stephen King’s novels, which was my inspiration for my reading challenge.

Book Sale Finder is an awesome site for finding local used book sales put on by local organizations or local libraries. Most sell hardcovers between $1-2 and paperbacks are even cheaper. We tend to hit up two of our local libraries on the weekends, and usually get in trouble by the husband for the amount of books I bring home. $10 usually goes a long way at these sales. My local library has a “red dot sale” that is $2 a bag full. I crammed 9 hardcover & paperbacks into a plastic grocery bag & even my husband was impressed. He thinks I won’t ever get around to reading them all, but he underestimates my passion.

“A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies, said Jojen. The man who never reads lives only one.”
George R.R. Martin, A Dance with Dragons